14Apr, 2016

April is Autism Awareness Month

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    Below is a post by Allie Smith, a wife, mother of four, and freelance writer living in the suburbs of Atlanta. She’s a columnist for My Forsyth Magazine, a book reviewer for Chick Lit Plus, and a contributor to The Family Legacy Center. She blogs about parenting, autism, travel, and books at The Latchkey Mom. Join the Autism Speaks Light It Up Blue movement to raise autism awareness around the globe. April is Autism Awareness Month. I’m the parent of a child with autism, and I’m aware that […]
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9Apr, 2016

Walkers…Baby Bouncers..are they good for your newborn

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For a first time parent, standing in a Babies R Us equipment aisle is an overwhelming experience. With all of the advertisements and Consumer Reports, it’s hard to tell which piece of equipment to use with your child. There are bouncers, swings, Bumbo seats, ExerSaucers, and more. So, what do you really need? The answer – nothing! Truthfully, most infants are happy simply being held and listening to familiar voices. When awake and not being held, infants are best on their stomachs on the floor, where they can explore their […]
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28Mar, 2016

Modeling Clay helping in developing hand skills in your children

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Modeling Clay is a great tool for helping your child develop hand skills. The texture and resistance are great for building up the muscles in the hands. However, when it is time to pull out the tub of modeling clay, hold off on using all of the cool tools and gadgets. Hasbro has made some awesome and exciting accessories to go with the rainbow of colors for modeling clay. Most of these tools do not promote the development of hand skills. These tools and modeling clay factories rely on pushing or pulling […]
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10Mar, 2016

Your Babies first year year, what sounds should you expect?

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At three months, your baby will begin to make sounds. The first sounds you can expect to hear are vowel sounds when your baby is cooing and making pleasure sounds (“oo,” “ah,” “uh,” “oh,” “ee”). At this time, your baby will also begin producing distinctive cries when they are hungry, wet, etc. They will then begin producing strings of vowels with varying intonation. When your baby begins babbling at four to six months, the first consonants they are likely to produce are “bilabial” sounds, produced with their lips (p, b, […]
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2Mar, 2016

Gross Motor Deficits in Autism : Early intervention can impact overall development.

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  Early Intervention Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly common condition affecting an estimated 1 out of 94 children (based on diagnosis at 8 years of age). The increasing prevalence of this disorder is likely due to improved diagnostic criteria, societal awareness, and a broadening of the definition of autism to encompass Asperger’s syndrome (AS) and pervasive developmental disorder (PDD).1,2Autism is estimated to affect males over females by ratios of 6 to 1 to upward of 15 to 1. ASD is thought to be inherited, and children with a […]
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2Mar, 2016

Early Speech Development in Infants

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Often times, parents of a newborn will wonder which sounds will first be heard by their baby and how to help produce these sounds.  From the time a newborn baby reaches three months and starts making their first sounds to when a baby is 12 months and forms their first word, parents can expect to hear a wide variety of noises and sounds. In this blog, I will address these milestones as well as the activities parents can perform to help their newborn progress.  Please note, these milestones are meant […]
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19Feb, 2016

What does sensory processing disorder look like?

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Sensory processing (sometimes called “sensory integration” or SI) is a term that refers to the way the nervous system receives messages from the senses and turns them into appropriate motor and behavioral responses. Whether you are biting into a hamburger, riding a bicycle, or reading a book, your successful completion of the activity requires processing sensation or “sensory integration.” Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD, formerly known as “sensory integration dysfunction”) is a condition that exists when sensory signals don’t get organized into appropriate responses. Pioneering occupational therapist and neuroscientist A. Jean […]
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18Feb, 2016

15 Signs Your Child May Have Dyslexia

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  The following information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. One out of every five children in the United States has dyslexia, a language-based learning disorder that can cause difficulties with spelling, writing, reading fluency, and word recognition. Early diagnosis can be extremely helpful, so here we’re sharing a rundown of the early signs of dyslexia in children.   Generally, symptoms of dyslexia include slow speech development, difficulty gauging directions, problems understanding sequences, poor reading ability, bad handwriting, poor organization abilities, […]
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17Feb, 2016

Your kids can learn things while playing

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  The act of playing is an important tool that influences a child’s life. The primary goals of childhood are to grow, learn, and play. It is often through play that children learn to make sense of the world around them. It is a child’s “job” or “occupation” to play to develop physical coordination, emotional maturity, social skills to interact with other children, and self-confidence to try new experiences and explore new environments. Occupational therapists have expertise in evaluating children’s neurological, muscular, and emotional development; and determining the effects of […]
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12Feb, 2016

Is your child’s handwriting a concern?

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  Increasing expectations in pre-school and kindergarten can mean children are learning to write much earlier than before. This has the potential to create multiple issues with your child’s handwriting. Gripping the pencil tightly, wrapping the thumb completely around the pencil, the hand becoming tired out easily, or letters appearing choppy without any smooth lines can all indicate your child has fine-motor coordination delay or weakness. ‘Fine motor’ refers to the development of small muscle movements of the hands which develop as your child’s whole body gains mobility, stability, cognitive, […]
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